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Wireless Compliance Testing and Evaluation




  • USA
    • FCC15.249 - Intentional Radiators. Transmitters that operate within the 902 - 928 MHz band are subject to FCC 47CFR15.249. The wireless transmitter carrier’s 20 dB bandwidth must be within the 902 - 928 MHz frequency band where operation is permitted under all conditions including modulation, frequency sweeping, hopping and stability, the frequency tolerance of the carrier, and over variation in temperature.
  • Canada
    • RSS-210 Issue 9 August 2016 Licence-Exempt Radio Apparatus:Category I Equipment.
  • European
    • ETSI EN 300 220-1 V1.3.1 (2000-09) Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Short Range Devices (SRD); Radio equipment to be used in the 25 MHz to 1 000 MHz frequency range with power levels ranging up to 500 mW; Part 1: Technical characteristics and test methods.
    • ETSI EN 301 489-12 V1.2.1 (2003-05) Electromagnetic compatibilityand Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 12: Specific conditions for Very Small Aperture Terminal, Satellite Interactive Earth Stations operated in the frequency ranges between 4 GHz and 30 GHz in the Fixed Satellite Service (FSS).
  • Wi-Fi
    • Understanding the most common Wi-Fi stanadrds Smith, 2011 January13.
    • IEEE Std 802.11-1997 Information technology-Telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and Metropolitan area networks-Specific requirements. Part 11:Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications.
      • The original! Created in 1997, this now-defunct standard supported a blazing fast maximum connection speed of megabits per second. Devices using this haven’t been made for over a decade and won’t work with today’s equipment.
    • IEEE Std 802.11a-1999(R2003) Supplement to IEEE Standard for Information technology-Telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and metropolitan area networks-Specific requirementsPart 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications High-speed Physical Layer in the 5 GHz Band.
      • Created in 1999, this version of Wi-Fi works on the 5 GHz band. This was done with the hope of encountering less interference, since many devices (like most wireless phones) use the 2.4 GHz band as well. 802.11a is fairly quick too, with maximum data rates topping out at 54 megabits per second. However, the 5GHz frequency has more difficulty with objects that are in the signal’s path, so the range is often poor.
    • IEEE Std 802.11b-1999 Supplement to IEEE Standard for Information technology—Telecommunications and information exchange between systems—Local and metropolitan area networks—Specific requirements—Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications: Higher-Speed Physical Layer Extension in the 2.4 GHz Band.
      • Also created in 1999, this standard uses the more typical 2.4 GHz band and can achieve a maximum speed of 11 megabits per second. 802.11b was the standard that kick-started Wi-Fi’s popularity.
    • IEEE Std 802.11g-2003 - IEEE Standard for Information technology-Telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and metropolitan area networks - Specific requirements Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications Amendment 4: Further Higher Data Rate Extension in the 2.4 GHz Band.
      • Designed in 2003, the 802.11g standard upped the maximum data rate to 54 megabits per second while retaining usage of the reliable 2.4 GHz band. This resulted in widespread adoption of the standard. Wireless g remains common even today, as it is adequately fast and routers lacking support of the new n standard are incredibly cheap.
    • ANSI/IEEE 802.11n-2009 - IEEE Standard for Information technology-- Local and metropolitan area networks-- Specific requirements-- Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC)and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications Amendment 5: Enhancements for Higher Throughput.
      • The newest Wi-Fi standard, n was actually introduced in 2009. It’s been adopted slowly, but it now common on routers and laptops. 802.11n can operate at both 2.4GHz and 5 GHz and it supports multi-channel usage. Each channel offers a maximum data rate of 150 megabits per second, which means the maximum data rate of the standard is 600 megabits per second. However, this requires hardware support, and I have yet to see a Wireless n router with more than three channels. The support must be on both ends as well, so you can’t make use of a dual or tri-channel router if your laptop only supports a single channel.
  • Zigbee
    • IEEE 802.15.4-2011 IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks — Part 15.4: Low-Rate Wireless Personal Area Networks (LR-WPANs).
      • Zigbee is a wireless technology developed as an open global standard to address the unique needs of low-cost, low-power wireless M2M networks. The Zigbee standard operates on the IEEE 802.15.4 physical radio specification and operates in unlicensed bands including 2.4 GHz, 900 MHz and 868 MHz.
  • Bluetooth
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